Welcome to the second part of the White Weenie deck guide. You can find the first part here. Today, I’m going to cover sideboarding.

Our version changed slightly from the article I submitted before the PT. After playing more against G/B, we decided that Tocatli was not a reliable way to answer Wildgrowth Walker and we just cut it from the sideboard entirely. That freed up some space in the sideboard and we added more cards for the mirror in the form of extra Baffling Ends and Aurelia. We spent the last evening trying out Venerated Loxodons in the mirror as well, but found out it’s too often too slow on the draw, opening you up to big attacks where it almost feels like giving your opponent a free Heroic Reinforcements when you play it. It’s still great in your perfect draws, but overall just too high variance. One more Conclave Tribunal was also added to the main deck to have a little bit more interaction. This is the 75 we ended up playing (basically the M19 intro deck):

White Weenie

Sideboarding Guide

White Weenie

Out

In

In the dark I am assuming that my opponent is on Heroic Reinforcements, in which case I am confident the matchup is in our favor. Obviously not by a huge amount, because it’s still a White Weenie mirror and they could always draw better, but we usually gain enough life to be able to usually ignore the first Reinforcement attack. Ajani’s Pridemate can easily turn into The Abyss in no time here. The advantage of having Pride of Conquerors is that you can choose when exactly to play it and destroy your opponent with it, whereas Reinforcement is a 4-mana sorcery that always does the same thing. Aurelia is a bit expensive, but sometimes the games go long where both players build a big board and it’s nice to have a trump for that. You are also almost always able to flip Legion’s Landing at your convenience. Use Baffling End mostly as an answer to Benalish Marshal, but don’t be afraid to use it as a tempo play. If your opponent has more expensive cards like Aurelia or Lyra (they would need to be on more lands than 20 though), keep some Conclave Tribunals for that.

Jeskai or U/B/x Control Decks

Out on the Play

Out on the Draw

In

Jeskai decks have a very hard time dealing with Adanto Vanguard, so your chances of winning improve by a lot if that’s your turn-2 play. Seal Away is pretty much the only cheap answer they have for it. They have a lot of sweepers like Deafening Clarion and Settle the Wreckage, but Experimental Frenzy trumps that after sideboard. It’s almost impossible for them to beat it if they can’t immediately remove it with Teferi or Invoke the Divine. Flipped Legion’s Landing is a huge problem for them as well, as almost no one plays Field of Ruin these days. The idea behind keeping Healer’s Hawks on the play is that it can help you grow Ajani’s Pridemate to 4/4 before they have Clarion mana. If you have the choice between an almost-but-not-lethal attack and killing Teferi, it’s almost always better to kill Teferi.

U/R Drakes

Out

In

This matchup is a basically a race where you are trying to kill them as fast as possible before their big Drakes can fly over your little ground creatures. In my experience, the fact that they spend the early turns playing cantrips means that you get so far ahead that one or two removal spells on your side for the turn-4 Crackling Drake is enough to get there. Pride is not good here because they keep killing your creatures. Expect them to have Fiery Cannonade, Shock, and Lava Coil at the minimum. If you know your opponent has both Electromancer and Enigma Drakes, then you want to board out two more 1-drops and have access to the full four Baffling Ends.

G/B

Out

In

Green-Black is not a good matchup. They board up to four Wildgrowth Walkers and multiple sweepers like Golden Demise and Ritual of Soot, on top of more spot removal like Cast Down. The plan of going wide with Pride of Conquerors is not possible against that, so we need to basically treat this matchup similarly to Jeskai Control and hope that they don’t have an answer for Experimental Frenzy. Sometimes they stumble and a big Ajani’s Pridemate protected by Bodyguard just gets there, but it’s unlikely. Unlike Tocatli, Baffling End gets rid of Wildgrowth Walker even after it has triggered a few times. If they are on more expensive cards like Doom Whisperer, keep some Conclave Tribunals.

Mono-Blue

Out

In

This matchup is very tricky. You need to keep Merfolk Trickster in mind, as it can basically erase even the indestructible keyword on Adanto Vanguard, so sometimes it’s just better not to attack. Playing spells precombat helps, as they are forced to choose between keeping mana up for the Trickster or using a counterspell, in which case you are able to attack freely. The key to this matchup is to try to race them instead of trying to answer their guy with Curious Obsession. This forces them to keep mana up for cards like Dive Down and Spell Pierce without advancing their board too much, but if you ignore it and instead keep playing more creatures and attacking, you are using your mana much more effectively. After sideboard, Baffling End is a cheap enough answer to a creature with Obsession or Tempest Djinn that you are happy to bring it in, but Conclave Tribunal costing you a big attack or getting countered for 1 mana is not what you want to be doing.

Boros Angels

Out

In

This is another matchup where Frenzy shines post-board. They are usually pretty slow, board out their Vanguards, and bring in Cannonade and more big stuff like Lyra. Even the aggro plan with Pride usually works, but it’s safer to bring in the Frenzies and win that way. Use Tribunal to answer their Lyra, Aurelia, and Phoenix. I’d like to have access to my own Aurelia here, but I’m a bit afraid that 21 lands just isn’t enough to bring in six 4-mana cards. Baffling End isn’t good because you are only interested in getting rid of Resplendent Angel with it. You don’t care about their Vanguard or Knight of Grace.

G/W

There are too many versions of this deck to have a definitive sideboard plan. There’s the version with March the Multitudes and explore creatures, another one with Tocatli and cards like Thorn Lieutenant, a more midrange version with planeswalkers like Karn and Vivien, and an Angels version with Resplendent Angel and Lyra. In general, you want to have Tribunal as an answer to cards like Lyra and Wildgrowth Walker, but ideally I’d stay away from enchantment removal if they are playing Knight of Autumn. At least History of Benalia and Legion’s Landing trade with it 1-for-1 but it feels pretty bad to have your Conclave Tribunal blown up by it. In general, this matchup isn’t going to be great if they have Wildgrowth Walker and Trostani (if that becomes popular, you can definitely put Tocatlis back in the sideboard) but you can still easily win by going wide faster then them and using Pride of Conquerors in one big attack.

Mono-Red

Out

In

This matchup is very bad. You can’t really beat Goblin Chainwhirler. It‘s usually best to play as if they don’t have it and hope that they don’t draw one. You aren’t going to win by trying to play around it by playing one guy at a time. After sideboard it gets a little better because you both have Frenzies, and you have an answer to theirs in the form of Conclave Tribunal. You become the control deck after sideboard and try to answer their guys and win with Frenzy.

Let me know in the comments if you prefer the deck screenshots better over the written form and good luck at GP Milwaukee!