Who doesn’t love durdling? Legacy usually doesn’t give you much room to do that, since it’s a format where you can lose as early as turn 1. Recently, though, we’ve seen the metagame slow down. Yes, you still have B/R Reanimator and Ad Nauseam Tendrils ready to punish you, but you now see more slow decks in the form of 4c Leovold Control.

The deck I’m showing you today is an old-time, tier-2-or-below deck that has risen in popularity recently online, with many 5-0s delivered by Allan Asmussen on MTGO. A few weeks ago, I picked up one of his winning lists in my recent video, but I didn’t like the deck because Natural Order felt weak and unnecessary, so I gave up up on it.

Allan hit me up on Facebook with his updated list, I made some last-minute adjustments, played it in a local event, and after some rounds where I only played against fair decks, I was undefeated and had a huge amount of fun! So I felt it mandatory to show to my Legacy followers, as this deck is pure gas.

Sultai Nic Fit

The Core of the Deck

Veteran Explorer

This little guy puts the deck on his shoulders. If it wasn’t for him, you wouldn’t be able to play all those overcosted mythic Sealed bombs! Veteran Explorer preys on the opponents that don’t have basics to fully take advantage of his ability. You can either block with him, or sacrifice him to one of your many sacrifice outlets, and get a boost of mana to hardcast your most powerful cards.

Against decks with white, it’s important to play around Swords to Plowshares by playing a sacrifice outlet before your Explorer.

Green Sun’s Zenith

This is another key card, not only because it tutors up your Veteran Explorer when you need to ramp, but also because once you have enough lands, this will be a payoff, letting you tutor up whichever creatures you want!

Baleful Strix

While this doesn’t go along with Zenith, it’s just one of the best cards in Legacy at the moment. The Strix is amazing versus any creature-based deck—Delver of Secrets especially—it’s a clear 2-for-1, a blue-pitch for Force of Will, and a body for Cabal Therapy and Recurring Nightmare. It just has it all!

Creature Package

You’ll see a lot of 1-ofs here, and no this is not one of Rachel’s Commander articles! 4 copies of Green Sun’s Zenith mean that you can choose whatever you like best for any scenario.

Deathrite Shaman is good if you don’t have a sacrifice outlet for Veteran Explorer and want to boost your mana.

Scavenging Ooze is fine versus opposing Deathrites and against Reanimator.

Eternal Witness is there when you need a removal spell that’s sitting in the graveyard, or a certain creature.

Tireless Tracker is here just for its raw card advantage. It isn’t a clock like Titania, Protector of Argoth, but plays well against removal spells and for a small investment.

Meren of Clan Nel Toth works only if you’re sure your opponent doesn’t have a removal spell, because it doesn’t do anything until the end of the turn. Then it’ll start the card advantage train.

Thragtusk is a powerful creature that will gain you a bunch of life and that will play well around removal.

Titania, Protector of Argoth is always a 2-for-1 and you can do even more with a Dryad Arbor plus a Cabal Therapy in the graveyard, or a Wasteland from the sideboard. You take it when you want to close the game quickly versus midrange decks.

Leovold, Emissary of Trest is the reason to be Sultai. He’s the card you’re most likely to tutor up first to make sure your opponent won’t be able to develop their game plan, while you beat them with Limited bombs.

It’s been a while since I’ve seen Pernicious Deed in Legacy, but this deck is perfect for it. It tends to fall behind in the early stages and doesn’t play many creatures, which will create the perfect turn to play your Deed and blow their board.

Sideboard

The sideboard is weird. It’s built with your awful game 1 against combo in mind, where you need a boost of countermagic and cheap interaction to have a shot.

Again, this deck isn’t tuned to beat Show and Tell or Goblin Charbelcher, but since you have access to blue, you are able to sideboard in 4 Force of Will and 3 Flusterstorm to deal with those unfair decks.

Unfortunately, this means that there isn’t that much space left in the sideboard for fair decks, but that’s not a big deal at all since your main deck is already so good against them. In the local event I played, I boarded in only 1 card the whole evening (1 Reclamation Sage versus Death & Taxes), and I still won all of my matches 2-0.

Crop Rotation is interesting since you can get your toolbox of lands from the sideboard, but you can also get Phyrexian Tower when you need a sacrifice outlet. When you board in the disruption cards versus combo, you will cut your durdling, overcosted creatures and a few other spells like Recurring Nightmare and Abrupt Decay. You’ll basically turn into a Sultai Leovold Control with discard spells, countermagic, and some pressure.

I really suggest you to try this deck out. It’s super fun, and even well positioned in the metagame!