Hello!

As you may or may not know, about three weeks ago I played in GP Paris with UWr Miracles. With a record of 12-2-1, I was supposed to finish in 9th place, but due to some weird incident a player was disqualified from the tournament and I managed to sneak in at 8th.

By the middle of the tournament, anyone could see that Miracles was doing very well. By round 10, all three undefeated players were playing UWr Miracles. All three ended up in the Top 8, and we had a combined four losses in the Swiss—three of which were to each other. While the deck did not win the tournament, I think it definitely put up the strongest performance, and I think it might be the strongest deck in Legacy right now.

At first, my inclination was to play an unfair deck. I wanted to be doing something powerful and I didn’t want to lose to [ccProd]True-Name Nemesis[/ccProd]. The problem with that approach was that I thought Delver decks, both BUG, RUG and RUW, would be the most popular decks in the format by a far amount, and the unfair decks don’t have a very easy time against the combination of fast clock plus cheap (often free!) disruption. Since I hate those Delver decks myself (I think they’re highly underpowered), I decided it would be a good idea to revert back to my usual [ccProd]Sensei’s Divining Top[/ccProd] + [ccProd]Counterbalance[/ccProd] combination, one that I’ve employed multiple times in Legacy tournaments across many years, always with at least some success. I came across Raphael Levy’s article on Miracles and decided to give a similar version a try.

I didn’t have a lot of time to practice, with the PT being the following week and all, but I didn’t want to go completely unprepared. Though Legacy doesn’t evolve a lot and is not much different than when I last played it in GP Denver, it had been almost a year and I wanted to at least get in the right mindset. For that, I played in some MTGO Daily Events. I did not have an impressive record, but I liked how the deck played and it was good to make up my mind on specific cards I wanted to try. I decided I would likely play Miracles, and stopped worrying about Legacy.

Some time later, I got not one but two messages from different people that I did not know saying that I really really should play Miracles at the GP—without ever really having asked anyone. It’s not uncommon for us to get messages from people who want us to try their decks and stuff like that, but those messages stuck me as different because they weren’t about any new deck, those people didn’t want me to try their brews, they genuinely thought that Miracles was the best deck and, when they heard I was going to Paris, they decided to share this information with me because they wanted me to do well, despite never having personally met me. That in itself was pretty unique, but the best part was that they were both suggesting the same deck and it happened to be the one deck in all of Legacy that I already had a predisposition for playing. If that is not a sign from heaven that one should actually play Miracles, then I’m not sure what is. (Perhaps the name Miracles?)

In Paris, I actually met one of the guys who messaged me with a list—Adrian Felix. He was pretty cool and helped me throughout the tournament with some sideboard input and how to play the deck in some matchups I was not familiar with, thanks a lot! His friend, playing the same list he had sent me, was also a very nice person and one of the other Miracle players in the Top 8. I also received some help the day before the tournament from another guy whose name I regrettably do not know, who had just won a trial with Miracles and let me take a look at his deck list. He convinced me that red was actually good in the sideboard and that a two-of [ccProd]Stoneforge Mystic[/ccProd] in the board made sense, and they were both pretty good for me, so thanks to you too, whoever you are! Also since we’re on the spirit of thanking people, I’d like to thank the guy who gave me a jar of Nutella out of the blue, that was very kind and appreciated. And delicious.

I’m not going to talk more about the tournament because I plan on doing a video recap of my interesting matches. Instead, I’m going to focus on the deck. This is what I played:

[ccdeck]2 Arid Mesa
4 Flooded Strand
4 Island
1 Karakas
1 Mystic Gate
2 Plains
4 Scalding Tarn
2 Tundra
2 Volcanic Island
2 Snapcaster Mage
2 Vendilion Clique
4 Brainstorm
2 Counterbalance
2 Counterspell
2 Entreat the Angels
4 Force of Will
2 Ponder
4 Sensei’s Divining Top
1 Spell Pierce
1 Spell Snare
4 Swords to Plowshares
4 Terminus
4 Jace, the Mind Sculptor
—–Sideboard—–
1 Batterskull
1 Enlightened Tutor
2 Ethersworn Canonist
1 Mountain
3 Pyroblast
2 Rest in Peace
2 Stoneforge Mystic
1 Tsabo’s Web
1 Vendilion Clique
1 Wear and Tear[/ccdeck]

For reference, these are the two other Top 8 lists:

Philipp Schönegger

[ccdeck]2 Arid Mesa
4 Flooded Strand
4 Island
1 Karakas
2 Plains
4 Scalding Tarn
3 Tundra
2 Volcanic Island
3 Snapcaster Mage
1 Vendilion Clique
4 Brainstorm
3 Counterbalance
2 Counterspell
2 Entreat the Angels
4 Force of Will
2 Ponder
4 Sensei’s Divining Top
2 Spell Pierce
4 Swords to Plowshares
4 Terminus
3 Jace, the Mind Sculptor
—–Sideboard—–
1 Counterspell
1 Disenchant
2 Engineered Explosives
1 Entreat the Angels
3 Flusterstorm
1 Pyroblast
2 Red Elemental Blast
2 Rest in Peace
1 Supreme Verdict
1 Vendilion Clique[/ccdeck]

Maxime Gilles

[ccdeck]3 Arid Mesa
4 Flooded Strand
4 Island
1 Karakas
2 Plains
3 Scalding Tarn
3 Tundra
2 Volcanic Island
2 Snapcaster Mage
2 Vendilion Clique
4 Brainstorm
3 Counterbalance
2 Counterspell
3 Entreat the Angels
4 Force of Will
2 Ponder
1 Pyroblast
1 Red Elemental Blast
4 Sensei’s Divining Top
1 Supreme Verdict
3 Swords to Plowshares
3 Terminus
3 Jace, the Mind Sculptor
—–Sideboard—–
1 Engineered Explosives
2 Flusterstorm
1 Grafdigger’s Cage
1 Mountain
1 Pithing Needle
1 Pyroclasm
1 Red Elemental Blast
1 Relic of Progenitus
2 Rest in Peace
1 Spell Pierce
1 Swan Song
1 Terminus
1 Wear and Tear[/ccdeck]

Pros

• You have a stronger end game than most decks in the format. UW Miracles is, by definition, a control deck. Most of the time, you’re in no rush to end the game because you will eventually win if the game goes long. You have a lot of very powerful cards, most notably Jace, and you have ways to make sure you never draw what you don’t want to draw with [ccProd]Sensei’s Divining Top[/ccProd], an advantage that adds up every turn the game progresses.

• You are very strong against discard. Having Sensei’s Divining Top and a card as powerful as [ccProd]Jace, the Mind Sculptor[/ccProd] means you can usually just play from the top of your deck. If they make you discard four cards and you land a Jace, it’s like they haven’t done anything. I think that any discard-based deck is a good matchup and it’s one of the reasons I like the deck.

• You don’t mulligan a lot. Miracles has many one-mana card selection spells and you can keep almost any hand that has one of those against an unknown opponent. That said, if you do have to mulligan, it mulligans relatively well for Legacy because it has Sensei’s Divining Top and a bunch of cards that can give you a great advantage—basically the same things that make you good against discard.

• You run a lot of basic lands. Many decks in Legacy simply can’t afford to run enough basics to fetch, but Miracles can run up to four Islands and two Plains, which is enough to cast all your spells even through [ccProd]Blood Moon[/ccProd] or multiple instances of [ccProd]Wasteland[/ccProd]. By virtue of simply having enough basic lands you weaken one of the strongest aspects of many Legacy decks.

• You don’t lose to True-Name Nemesis. That’s not to say the card is a blank against you, but you do have some counterspells and four [ccProd]Terminus[/ccProd], so you can definitely beat it.

• There’s no sideboard against you. People will bring in cards, but they will rarely be great. Even the most played counterspells, [ccProd]Pyroblast[/ccProd] and [ccProd]Flusterstorm[/ccProd], aren’t that great against you. Pyroblast doesn’t interact much with your early game (it doesn’t counter your removal, which is what you want to resolve against the Delver decks) and Flusterstorm doesn’t really counter anything. Those cards are great out of combo decks against you (because against combo the blue Instants are the cards you want), but you also have good cards against most of those decks. The main point is that if someone is looking for a card “to beat Miracles,” they probably won’t find it.

• It’s fun! Miracles has a lot of interesting decisions and I really enjoy playing it. Plus, every time you hit blindly with Counterbalance or blindly draw a Miracle card, you can practically hear your opponent thinking about how lucky you are.

Cons

• Miracles is a very complicated deck, more so than most Legacy decks (which are already complicated), because you have to plan many turns ahead with your Tops and Brainstorms and Ponders and Miracles and lands, and you will invariably make a lot of mistakes every game while playing it. I know I did and would certainly do again, and I have played my share of Top-Counterbalance decks in the past. The good news is that you don’t have to play perfectly to win games with it—if you mess up, the game continues. It’s not the same as messing up in the middle of your [ccProd]Doomsday[/ccProd] combo. While it can be unforgiving at times, I think it’s a great deck for you to pick up if you have some time to practice with it, because it uses general Magic concepts that you will apply for other decks in the future as well.

• Miracles is slow. If you are a slow player, you might have time concerns because you have to use Top every turn and you need to do a lot of shuffling; all that thinking ahead makes you use up time too. You even need to be cautious with your draw steps, because you might draw a Miracle. I don’t usually have time troubles with any deck because I’m extremely fast from a mechanics point of view (meaning I might take a while to make decisions, but once I do then I play very quickly—I untap, draw, play stuff, pass my turn, all in a heartbeat) but that didn’t stop me from getting an unintentional draw at the GP. Even if you don’t get draws, you will take a while to play every round and it will be exhausting. My advice if you’re slow would be to either speed up mechanically (don’t play in slow motion; when you want to do something, just do it quickly) and to use the time when your opponent is thinking to also do your own thinking.

• Miracles has very little pressure. This is an issue against certain combo decks because you don’t have enough [ccProd]Counterspell[/ccProd]s in your deck that they can’t brute force through if you give them ample time. Counterbalance is a form of pressure, as is [ccProd]Vendilion Clique[/ccProd], but you don’t have the equivalent of a [ccProd]Delver of Secrets[/ccProd], so in some games they just end up killing you even after you’ve stopped the initial rush.

Tips

• Never crack a fetchland unless you have to. Deck-thinning is, for all intents and purposes, completely irrelevant. I don’t care if you have three fetchlands in play—you run Tops, Brainstorms and Ponders, so just leave those there. Seriously.

• Always lead with a basic land if you can, unless you think you’re going to need to stack your deck and you don’t want to be forced to shuffle. There was a match, for example, in which I wanted to go [ccProd]Brainstorm[/ccProd] into [ccProd]Counterbalance[/ccProd]. Because of that, I needed to play the fetchland first, since I would need the mana to cast Counterbalance and I wanted to be able to get it without having to shuffle that specific casting cost away from the top of my deck. In most scenarios, though, lead with the “normal” lands and play fetches last.

• Try to have a white mana in play, or a way to get it, as early as possible—even if you have no white cards, you might draw a [ccProd]Terminus[/ccProd] and want to cast it before you have the chance to play a land.

• A Miracle card is in your hand, not on top of your deck. That means you can stack the trigger and shuffle your library with a fetchland to get mana, for example. You can also Vendilion Clique away their Miracle cards.

• Try to always know what you have on top and in what order. Sometimes you’re caught off guard and you need to spin Top to cast a spell, but you need to know what that spell is—wasting a mana to Top again “to make sure” and leaving the exact same card on top can be the difference between winning and losing. If you have the mana to spare, though, then go ahead.

• When you think they might destroy your Sensei’s Divining Top in response to a fetch, you should activate the “1: look at three cards” ability and, with that on the stack, sacrifice your fetchland. That way, even if they do kill Top, you will shuffle your deck and have a look at the new top three cards. If you do it the “normal” way (sacrifice the land, shuffle, then activate Top), you might find yourself without a Top by the time you’re done shuffling and then you’re stuck with the top card.

• When you have a [ccProd]Batterskull[/ccProd] and a [ccProd]Stoneforge Mystic[/ccProd] in play and you want to recast it, activate Stoneforge first, and then, with that on the stack, bounce Batterskull. If you do it the “normal” way and they kill the Stoneforge Mystic in response to Batterskull bouncing, then you can’t recast it, but if you do it this way then they can’t stop you.

Now, let’s move to the individual card choices and the differences between the three lists:

Lands: We all ran the same lands, except I had a [ccProd]Mystic Gate[/ccProd] and they had an extra Tundra. Though Mystic Gate is a great card, especially with so many basics, I regretted not having a third Tundra many times throughout the tournament; it was especially painful in a game where both my Tundras got Wastelanded and my Plains got discarded, so I couldn’t cast my [ccProd]Entreat the Angels[/ccProd] because I had no other white land to fetch. I’d go up to three Tundras.

[ccProd]Jace, the Mind Sculptor[/ccProd]: I ran four, whereas the other two guys ran three. I believe four is correct; Jace is the most important card in your deck (after Top, I guess) in any black matchup and in the mirror (where it’s actually more important than Top), and, though it’s clunky in some matchups, you can afford to play four because you have so much selection and it’s a blue card for [ccProd]Force of Will[/ccProd]. I don’t mind sideboarding down to two in some matchups, particularly if you’re bringing other kill conditions and they have a bunch of “counter unless you pay X” things, but I like starting four.

[ccProd]Snapcaster[/ccProd]/[ccProd]Vendilion[/ccProd]: Maxime and I ran two of each, and Philipp ran a three/one split. I really like Vendilion Clique and, though Snapcaster is a good card, it doesn’t give you any new angles of attack—Vendilion does. Knowing their hand is important information and it works wonders with [ccProd]Karakas[/ccProd]. I would certainly not be opposed to a third Snapcaster—the deck does need more 2s for Counterbalance—but I would like to play two Vendilions. I also played one in the board and I think it’s really good for most combo and control matchups, which are a sizeable portion of the field.

[ccProd]Entreat the Angels[/ccProd]: Maxime played three, Philipp and I played two. I think three is excessive; you only need it in the late game and drawing it in your opening hand is not good. Philipp had a third in the board, but I think Vendilion Clique fills that role better.

[ccProd]Counterbalance[/ccProd]: I like Counterbalance a lot and could see playing three. It’s mediocre sometimes, but it’s very good against any combo and the mirror, and what I said about Jace applies to Counterbalance as well—when it’s bad, you have plenty of ways to get rid of it. If I have to choose one I choose the fourth Jace, I think, but 4/3 is really not a bad split. Right now I’d stick to 4/2 because I have no clue what to take out, though.

[ccProd]Terminus[/ccProd]/[ccProd]Swords to Plowshares[/ccProd]: I would play four of each. Terminus is unmatched in its power and Swords to Plowshares in its efficiency, and most decks in Legacy have creatures you want to kill. Maxime’s split of three Terminus and one [ccProd]Supreme Verdict[/ccProd] in particular doesn’t make much sense to me, as Terminus is cheap enough that it avoids most counterspells (Daze, Pierce) anyway.

[ccProd]Spell Pierce[/ccProd]/[ccProd]Spell Snare[/ccProd]: I like the split, but it depends on the metagame you expect. I thought there were going to be a lot of UWR decks, and I wanted Snare to counter [ccProd]Stoneforge Mystic[/ccProd]. I only played against one UWR, but Snare was good against a variety of other decks too that I wouldn’t be sad about playing it again. For a moment I thought about playing [ccProd]Force Spike[/ccProd], but my friends said it was stupid and forbade me from doing it.

[ccProd]Pyroblast[/ccProd]/[ccProd]Red Elemental Blast[/ccProd]: Those cards are very powerful right now, since most decks play blue, but I wouldn’t maindeck them because you can’t afford to maindeck a Mountain, and half the decks you want this against will have Wastelands. I want to have Pyroblast to be able to kill Delver, but I don’t want to have an uncastable card in my deck, or one I can’t flashback with Snapcaster; I think Mountain and Pyroblasts are a package deal, and one that’s worth it out of the sideboard, but not in the maindeck.

[ccProd]Flusterstorm[/ccProd]: This card is good against spell-based combo (Storm, Reanimator), but I would not board this in against any “fair” deck, no matter how many spells they play—it’s a much worse Spell Pierce unless they have counters for your counters or are playing Storm cards. Even in the mirror I don’t think it’s good because it doesn’t hit Counterbalance or Jace, and I wouldn’t board it in.

[ccProd]Stoneforge Mystic[/ccProd]/[ccProd]Batterskull[/ccProd]: This package is insanely good. People usually take out removal against you, and then this card just wins the game. I played against Philipp in round 12 and won a game on a mulligan to four because he had no answer to my Stoneforge. If they do bring in removal, you don’t really care—it’s only a two-of and you can always manually cast Batterskull. I bring this in against the mirror and against most fair decks without black—against black decks I don’t like it because they have [ccProd]Abrupt Decay[/ccProd]s and because they can always just [ccProd]Thoughtseize[/ccProd] your Batterskull and you have no way to get it back.

[ccProd]Enlightened Tutor[/ccProd]: I like a one-of Tutor in the board because it serves as an extra copy of whatever hate card you need ([ccProd]Rest in Peace[/ccProd] and [ccProd]Ethersworn Canonist[/ccProd] in my version) while also being able to get a Top or a Counterbalance. If I were to play two Rest in Peace and two Canonist, for example, I’d probably prefer playing one of each and one Tutor, saving one slot. In my case it’d be 3/2 so it became 2/2/1. If you have other bullets, such as Blood Moon, it gets better.

[ccProd]Tsabo’s Web[/ccProd]: Tsabo’s Web is a card I really like, always have. It replaces itself and locks down all [ccProd]Rishadan Port[/ccProd]s, [ccProd]Karakas[/ccProd], [ccProd]Mishra’s[/ccProd], [ccProd]Mutavault[/ccProd], and to a lesser extent even [ccProd]Thespian Sage[/ccProd], [ccProd]Horizon Canopy[/ccProd], and [ccProd]Wasteland[/ccProd]. It’s not really meant to be a tutorable bullet (Blood Moon is better for this, I think) but it’s a great card to draw against Death and Taxes, Merfolk and any sort of Lands deck. I only boarded it in once throughout the tournament, so it probably shouldn’t be there (though a Blood Moon might be good if those [ccProd]Dark Depths[/ccProd] deck become popular).

[ccProd]Ethersworn Canonist[/ccProd]: For Storm Combo and Elves, but also for Show and Tell; they run a lot of counters of their own, and Canonist makes sure they can’t use them to fight your Counters. If at any point your hand is, say, a Counterspell and a Pyroblast, and you resolve Canonist, then you can make sure they need three threats to win the game—their own counters won’t help. [ccProd]Meddling Mage[/ccProd] would be better against Show and Tell, I think, and arguably also better against Elves, but I like the fact that Canonist is tutorable. In retrospect, I think I should have played only one as a bullet, perhaps replacing it with a Flusterstorm.

[ccProd]Wear // Tear[/ccProd]: If you have access to red, it’s the best Disenchant you can play. It counts for one and two for Counterbalance, kills enchantments for only one mana, and gets rid of both Counterbalance and Top if you manage to get them before a shuffle effect. I don’t understand why Philipp played Disenchant over Wear // Tear in his sideboard.

Some general sideboard rules:

• If one card is not particularly more important than others, side out [ccProd]Force of Will[/ccProd]. It’s good against combo and in the mirror, but that’s about it.

• If you’re bringing in Blasts against a Wasteland/Daze/Pierce deck, bring in the Mountain and go up to 23 lands. If they don’t have those, then feel free to stay at 22.

• Don’t bring Stoneforge Mystic in if they have discard in their deck; bring it in against blue decks without black and against creature decks.

• Don’t bring in Enlightened Tutor unless you really want to draw a Rest in Peace or a Canonist. Against some BUG decks, for example, you might be bringing in Rest in Peace, but it’s not important enough for you to bring in Tutor.

• Be flexible; there is no hard rule when it comes to sideboarding, you need to adapt based on what you see and how they play.

Now, the matchups—I’m not going to talk about every deck in Legacy because that’d be impossible, but this should give you an idea so you can extrapolate for the others:

BUG Delver: I think BUG Delver is a good matchup, and I beat three of them throughout the tournament. Your cards are simply more powerful, and they don’t have enough pressure to stop you from getting to play them. Your removal only costs one, so it’s very hard to counter, and it often comes from the top of your deck so it’s hard to discard. Your biggest worry in this matchup is [ccProd]Liliana of the Veil[/ccProd], which not everyone has. You don’t have many good ways to stop it and, while you’re resilient to discard, the ultimate is good versus you. If they have a Liliana, they will usually have no hand as well, which means you can at least cast unopposed anything that you topdeck— Vendilion Clique, Jace, or Entreat the Angels are the cards you’re looking for here. Entreat is especially good against Liliana, and in the tournament I beat one that came down turn three, ultimated, and went up to five counters again, simply because at some point I Topped into an Entreat the Angels.

For Liliana players, one tip: don’t sacrifice it to use the ultimate, just wait until you have seven counters. I’d often sacrifice two or three lands to get rid of it if I could, and when people send it away to double Stone Rain me I’m generally very happy. If you wait until it has seven counters, then it becomes much harder to win.

I sideboard (just a rough guide because people always ask for it, but, again, be flexible):

Out

-4 [ccProd]Force of Will[/ccProd] (they are already discarding my stuff, no sense in helping them)
-2 [ccProd]Snapcaster Mage[/ccProd] (if you bring in Rest in Peace)
-1 Something

In

+3 [ccProd]Pyroblast[/ccProd]
+1 [ccProd]Mountain [/ccProd]
+2 [ccProd]Rest in Peace[/ccProd] (Goyf, Tombstalker, Deathrite)
+1 [ccProd]Vendilion Clique[/ccProd]

Another approach is taking out Counterbalances and not boarding in Rest in Peaces, which makes their Abrupt Decays useless.

UWR/RUG Delver: Another good matchup. They can’t really pressure you enough most of the time, and you win the late game based on the fact that you have good cards and they have bad cards. I usually don’t mind running things into [ccProd]Daze[/ccProd] in the early game because you have so many spells you want to play that it’s worth just getting rid of it—it’s going to get something eventually anyway, so it might as well be on turn one when it’ll at least set them back a bit. I’ll not run Swords into Daze or Pierce generally, though, because if those get countered then sometimes you just lose the game, but if they resolve then it gives you ample time because their deck doesn’t have enough threats.

Out

-4 [ccProd]Force of Will[/ccProd]
-2 [ccProd]Jace, the Mind Sculptor[/ccProd] (you have Mystics as a “kill condition” now, and they run lots of ways to stop Jace)
-1 Something

In

+3 [ccProd]Pyroblast[/ccProd]
+1 [ccProd]Mountain[/ccProd]
+2 [ccProd]Stoneforge Mystic[/ccProd]
+1 [ccProd]Batterskull[/ccProd]

Show and Tell: Not a good matchup. You don’t have enough pressure to stop them from comboing, and Counterbalance is not even necessarily a lock because they have 3s and 4s and you don’t have many of those (though if you do assemble this combination then you win on the spot). Vendilion Clique is very important here, because it lets you know just how much you can tap out for, and Karakas is great at getting rid of a Show and Tell’d [ccProd]Emrakul[/ccProd], though it does absolutely nothing against [ccProd]Sneak Attack[/ccProd].

Out

-4 [ccProd]Terminus[/ccProd]
-4 [ccProd]Swords to Plowshares[/ccProd] (Trying to beat a [ccProd]Griselbrand[/ccProd] is not good—you aren’t going to do it, so just try to stop them from getting it into play. I think against Reanimator then this approach is a little better, since they reanimate stuff like [ccProd]Iona[/ccProd] on blue and [ccProd]Ashen Rider[/ccProd] sometimes, but it’s still not good).

In

+2 [ccProd]Ethersworn Canonist[/ccProd]
+3 [ccProd]Pyroblast[/ccProd]
+1 [ccProd]Vendilion Clique[/ccProd]
+1 [ccProd]Wear // Tear[/ccProd]
+1 [ccProd]Mountain[/ccProd]

[ccProd]Pithing Needle[/ccProd] would be good here—if I have that, then I’d also board in a Tutor.

The Mirror: The mirror is a pretty cool matchup and usually revolves around Jace and Counterbalance. Top is a good card, but it’s less important than those two, so I don’t like blindly Force of Willing it. If they have a second Top then you are way behind, and games usually go long enough that they can find one. Since costs match a lot (well, obviously, you’re playing the same deck) and there are cards like Brainstorm and Ponder, I’ll usually counter Counterbalance if I can—even spending Force of Will to do so. If you let it resolve, then it’s going to be disruptive to you throughout the entire game. If you resolve a Jace, well, that’s your kill condition. Make sure you have a way to stop an End of Turn Entreat the Angels (Terminus or a Counterspell) and you are probably not going to lose.

Out

-4 [ccProd]Swords to Plowshares[/ccProd]
-4 [ccProd]Terminus[/ccProd]

In

+3 [ccProd]Pyroblast[/ccProd]
+1 [ccProd]Vendilion Clique[/ccProd]
+1 [ccProd]Wear // Tear[/ccProd]
+2 [ccProd]Stoneforge Mystic[/ccProd]
+1 [ccProd]Batterskull[/ccProd]

If you take out all the Terminus then a big Entreat is just game, but I’m not sure what you can do about that, because you really don’t want Terminus in your deck if you’re in any other spot, and even if they cast Entreat and you have it it’s sometimes not good enough because you also need a Top. If they cast a small one, then you can have your own or a Stoneforge. I was able to beat an Entreat for two in a game, for example, but would likely not have beat an Entreat for four. I don’t think you need the Mountain because they can’t Wasteland your Volcanics.

Well, that’s about it. If you want any advice on another deck feel free to ask in the forums. I hope you’ve enjoyed this and see you next week!

PV