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PV’s Playhouse – GP: Santiago Report (*6th*)

Hello!

This is my GP Chile report.

GP Chile was, in three ways, the most unique tournament of the year for me. First, it was actually close to where I live – a four hour direct flight. For many of you this might not seem “close” at all, but most US tournaments take me almost a whole day and have at least two connecting flights; the tournament being in Chile meant that I could leave and get there on the same day, which is something I can never do, and it also meant I would get to meet a lot of my Brazilian friends that don’t go to American GPs. Second, it was the only tournament this year that was held in a place I hadn’t already visited, which is ironic considering it is the closest to me; I remember when every tournament location was a big novelty, but now it seems they just repeat the same spots over and over, which takes away some of the “play the game, see the world” aspect of it. I mean, don’t get me wrong, Singapore is awesome, but I was way more excited about it the first time than the second time.

Third, it was the first tournament I can remember where University really got in my way. For the past two years, I’ve managed to juggle playing professional Magic and doing well at the University, due to a combination of the major I study not being very hard, my teachers being understanding and my classmates being awesome – I’m not going to say it was very easy but it was not very hard either, and I was never in any real danger of failing or having to give up on playing. This time, though, it seemed that every exam, essay and project was scheduled for the week before the GP. Of course, if I had actually anticipated things on any level, by either practicing as soon as the set came out or by doing the school stuff as soon as I got it, then I wouldn’t have had a problem, but since I am the master procrastinator I left everything for the last possible minute and that meant I could not practice at all. So, armed with exactly one online sealed and zero drafts under my belt, I flew to Chile on Thursday night.

I was going to room with Luis and Web, who would only get there on Friday, so I decided to go to a Hostel with some other Brazilian guys for Thursday. Hostels are not very good for tournaments, since it’s hard to sleep well with some people getting back at 3 AM and others waking up three hours later, but I figured it was fine, since it was not during the tournament and my flight got there pretty late anyway at 2 AM, so I would likely just fall asleep as soon as I got there. That didn’t work very well and I slept miserably, but, hey, it was only 9 dollars!
I took a cab by myself to the event, and he stopped at a building that looked like anything but a Magic tournament. Still, the address checked, so I got out. When I got inside the building there were people asking for a tournament, and it turned out it was the right place, but on the fifth floor. It also turned out the taxi driver had overcharged me by about 200% – at the time I didn’t notice, because I had no clue about prices in Santiago and it was not actually expensive (like 8 dollars), but it is a despicable attitude regardless of the amount (the way I see it, this is no different than reaching for my Wallet and stealing 5 bucks when I’m not looking) and I wish him a very painful death.

My plan was to arrive and do some drafts, but that was not very easy to accomplish, since everyone I knew wanted to play sanctioned tournaments for their 5x Planeswalker Points – I suppose that, if that was the goal, they’ve succeeded. At some point we found 6 people and drafted, and then we drafted a second time, and the only thing preventing me from my customary 1-2 was that we lost draft 2 before I could play my third round. Still, I was literally reading the cards to figure out what they did, and those 5 matches I played did wonders for my knowledge of the format. Soon after that, the other Channelfireball guys arrived and we discussed the format, though it soon turned to specific cards discussion since everyone agreed that there were basically two main archetypes you should pursuit, GW aggro and UB/UR mill yourself.

On Saturday morning, we were met with the announcement that all the packs were going to be in Spanish, which I was not in love with because I did not know all the cards by heart, especially the nuances – is this card a may or a must, creature I control or any creature, etc. It ended up not being a problem for me, since Spanish and Portuguese are quite similar, but it was definitely a nuisance in writing the decklist, and I can only imagine it was harder for people who do not speak either Spanish or Portuguese. When we asked for English packs, the excuse that was given for not having them was “we didn’t plan for this”, but it seems like really poor planning if you weren’t expecting a single non-Spanish speaking person to show up.

Another downside of the cards being in Spanish (probably the biggest one) is that I need to find out the names of every card to write my pool in the article, since the set is new and I don’t match all the cards with their names yet. I originally had the genius idea of taking a picture of the pool, but then I realized I’d be putting you through the same thing I just complained I had to go through, so I translated it and here it is:

[deck]1 Moorland Haunt
1 Grimgrin, Corpse-Born
1 Geistcatcher’s Rig
1 Cobbled Wings
1 One-Eyed Scarecrow
1 Sharpened Pitchfork
1 Silver-Inlaid Dagger
1 Elite Inquisitor
1 Fiend Hunter
1 Midnight Haunting
1 Smite the Monstrous
1 Voiceless Spirit
1 Abbey Griffin
1 Mentor of the Meek
1 Gallows Warden
1 Doomed Traveler
1 Selfless Cathar
1 Urgent Exorcism
1 Feeling of Dread
2 Fortress Crab
2 Silent Departure
1 Forbidden Alchemy
1 Stitched Drake
1 Civilized Scholar
1 Deranged Assistant
1 Claustrophobia
1 Ludevic’s Test Subject
1 Lantern Spirit
1 Dissipate
1 Bump in the Night
1 Dead Weight
1 Victim of the Night
1 Manor Skeleton
1 Diregraf Ghoul
1 Ghoulcaller’s Chant
1 Markov Patrician
1 Night Terrors
1 Vampire Interloper
1 Rotting Fensnake
1 Reckless Waif
1 Rage Thrower
2 Crossway Vampire
2 Into the Maw of Hell
1 Kessig Wolf
1 Curse of the Pierced Heart
1 Nightbird’s Clutches
1 Ashmouth Hound
1 Skirsdag Cultist
1 Rakish Heir
1 Night Revelers
1 Pitchburn Devils
1 Harvest Pyre
1 Village Ironsmith
1 Devil’s Play
1 Prey Upon
1 Travel Preparations
1 Caravan Vigil
1 Hamlet Captain
1 Ulvenwald Mystics
1 Spidery Grasp
1 Darkthicket Wolf
1 Grizzled Outcasts
1 Grave Bramble[/deck]

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White is certainly appealing; [card]Elite Inquisitor[/card], [card]Fiend Hunter[/card] and [card]Mentor of the Meek[/card] are very good, and [card]Midnight Haunting[/card], [card]Smite the Monstrous[/card], [card]Voiceless Spirit[/card] and [card]Gallows Warden[/card] are solid. It also gives us access to [card]Moorland Haunt[/card], which is very good.

Blue is also good – it has an excellent finisher and solid cards. If we play Blue, then Black will likely be present at least as a splash for [card]Grimgrin, Corpse-Born[/card] and [card]Forbidden Alchemy[/card].

Black is not exciting – [card]Dead Weight[/card] and [card]Bump in the Night[/card] are the only cards that really pull me towards this color. If we play Black, it’ll likely be a splash.

Red is excellent and we will very likely play it – it has some solid creatures, one of the best cards in the set and two unconditional removal, which is in very short supply in this format and very good in any sealed.

Green was the first color I dismissed, since it didn’t have any bombs or a significant amount of good cards. After that, Black was also gone, since it didn’t look like it offered enough to be a main color. That left me with WRU, and I could see myself playing any combination of those. I thought Red was too strong not to play, because of the [card]Devil’s Play[/card] and the [card]Into the Maw of Hell[/card] (how cool is that name, by the way?), which is not only one of the few unconditional removals in the set but also works wonders to get them off their splash that a lot of people have for Flashback, and between White and Blue I chose Blue with a black splash because it had two end-gaming bombs and some card advantage in the form of [card]Forbidden Alchemy[/card]. It ended up like this:

[deck]1 Crossway Vampire
2 Into the Maw of Hell
1 Kessig Wolf
1 Ashmouth Hound
1 Skirsdag Cultist
1 Rakish Heir
1 Night Revelers
1 Pitchburn Devils
1 Harvest Pyre
1 Village Ironsmith
1 Devil’s Play
1 Silent Departure
1 Forbidden Alchemy
1 Stitched Drake
1 Civilized Scholar
1 Deranged Assistant
1 Claustrophobia
1 Ludevic’s Test Subject
1 Lantern Spirit
1 Dissipate
1 Grimgrin, Corpse-Born
1 Geistcatcher’s Rig
8 Mountain
7 Island
2 Swamp[/deck]

The last slot was particularly hard – I like [card]Silent Departure[/card] a lot, but all my other spells were better and I didn’t see a whole lot of benefits in taking out a creature for a bounce spell – what am I going to do with the bounce? It’s not like I have a lot of pressure and can kill them before they replay their guy. Playing the [card]Crossway Vampire[/card]s was, in retrospect, a mistake – [card]Reckless Waif[/card] is a way better card, since it’s basically the same but comes attached with a couple free wins, so I swapped those every time, as well as boarding in the [card]Silent Departure[/card] if they were playing Green.

I was happy with my deck – it had good removal, bombs and a semblance of a curve, the only problem being the mana, which was not awesome with a splash and double-colored cards in both colors, but I guess you can’t have everything.

Most of my Sealed games were not very interesting, so I’m going to skip a match-by-match recap. I did learn a couple things about the format, though:

1) It has the potential to be very fast. Both my match losses came not to bomb rares but to curved opponents, and both times I had good spells in my hand that I didn’t have the time to play. By the beginning of the tournament, I was choosing to draw first, since it’s usually better in sealed, but by the end of it I was defaulting to play first – some decks can punish you too much if they get ahead and you end up losing more than the extra card due to not being able to cast anything. If you have [card]Dead Weight[/card], [card]Sensory Deprivation[/card], [card]Geistflame[/card]s and the like, then I can see drawing first, but if your removal is expensive like mine then I think playing first is better, and then once you see their decks in game 1 you adapt. I think that, in general, you want to play against base Red, White and Green decks, and draw against base Blue and base Black, or Black/Red.

2) Good removal is very scarce. You can spend your “little” removal early, but you should save the “real” removal for the really important threats, in this format more than in others because, unless you’re as lucky as I am, you’ll probably not have many of them. This is true for a card like [card]Dissipate[/card] too – as far as I am concerned, the best [card]Dissipate[/card] is the one that is still in your hand by the time you win the game.

3) Everything in this set is a must. That was quite infuriating when, in round 8, my opponent had [card]Angel of Flight Alabaster[/card] and forgot to return his guy and I had to remind him. I don’t know why they keep making cards like this a must – all this does if benefit people who cheat, if not encouraging them to cheat outright, or make the honest people feel bad (or give someone many warnings for not paying attention). My opponent even said “it’s fine, I forgot”, I had to force him to bring his guy back and I think I lost the game because of that. Some of those cards don’t even make sense to be musts anyway – in a set with [card]Stitched Drake[/card]s/[card]Makeshift Mauler[/card]s and [card]Unburial Rites[/card], it is conceivable you don’t want to return anything, why take that strategic option away?

4) Checklists are horrible to play with, just sleeve your deck.

5) Many hands that look like fine keeps are actually mulligans due to cards that depend on your graveyard. Take, for example, a hand of [card]Stitched Drake[/card], [card]Harvest Pyre[/card], and 5 lands – some people would be tempted to keep it, but it clearly does nothing despite being “5 land, a creature and a removal spell”. If you’re playing Blue, Red or Black (but Blue especially) you should remember that there are some of your cards you won’t be able to cast, and then you should mulligan those hands – I don’t care if you have three [card]Forbidden Alchemy[/card]’s to draw into, you can’t keep a hand like that.

6) There is a lot of stuff with Flash, and if you’re playing against White you should really pause and consider the implications of your attack rather than bashing straight into [card]Midnight Haunting[/card] / [card]Rebuke[/card] / [card]Village Bell-Ringer[/card]. Sometimes, it’s better to just not attack.

Anyway, after 14 hours, we were done with day 1 and I was slightly unhappy about my 7-2 record. When I say 14 hours, I am not exaggerating – the tournament had ridiculous delays and ended at midnight despite only having 700 people. Then, they announced that the next day would start at 8 AM. To me, this was the very worst aspect of the entire GP (and believe me, it’s a good competition) – after the tournament is over, we have to get back, eat, manage to fall asleep and then wake up, shower, go to the tournament with time to spare, which leaves 6 hours tops of sleep if we’re fast about doing all that. Then they expect us to go and play one of the world’s hardest games – how?!? Those timetables are just extremely disrespectful to the players – if you’re going to have the biggest delay a Magic tournament has ever seen on day 1, then at least have the decency to start day 2 a little bit later to give people time to sleep, even if it means you have to end day 2 a little bit later too. Yes, I understand no one is happy about it, including the judges and the TO, but a judge who sleeps 5 hours is not much worse than a judge who sleeps 8, whereas a player will be radically different if he can get no sleep – basically, it directly impacts my ability to play (and to win money) if I can’t get enough sleep, whereas for the judges it’s a minor inconvenience.

I was in table 5 for day two if I am not mistaken, and I didn’t recognize anyone else in it, always a good sign. I started with an awesome rare in [card]Sever the Bloodline[/card] (which turned out to be much better than I expected), and followed it with a [card]Brimstone Volley[/card] and a [card]Moan of the Unhallowed[/card]. Next came a [card]Deranged Assistant[/card] and a [card]Nephalia Drownyard[/card], putting me into some sort of UBr millself deck, or so I assumed. Two [card]Diregraf Ghoul[/card]s and a [card]Vampire Interloper[/card] rounded up my pack 1. For pack two, I opened [card]Brimstone Volley[/card], [card]Instigator Gang[/card] and no Blue cards, but it looked like Blue wasn’t coming and my cards hinted at something that was more aggressive than UB Millself, so I took the Gang and started taking BR cards. I opened a [card]Devil’s Play[/card] (again!) pack three and my deck ended up looking very good:

[deck]3 Vampire Interloper
2 Diregraf Ghoul
1 Instigator Gang
2 Into the Maw of Hell
1 Devil’s Play
1 Sever the Bloodline
1 Stromkirk Patrol
1 Falkenrath Noble
1 Moan of the Unhallowed
1 Sever the Bloodline
1 Village Ironsmith
1 Night Revelers
1 Markov Patrician
1 Traitorous Blood
1 Demonmail Hauberk
1 Rage Thrower
1 Corpse Lunge
1 Walking Dead
1 Crossway Vampire
8 Mountain
9 Swamp[/deck]

My deck had a good curve, good removal, enough card advantage in Flashback spells and bombs – I really couldn’t ask for much more. My first two matches were very easy, and I ended every game with extra removal in my hand. My last match was not easy at all, despite my opponent having an uncanny aversion to blocking; In game one, I started with Ironsmith into Patrician, and he played Voiceless Spirit. On turn four I played [card]Crossway Vampire[/card]s and hit him down to 11, going to 23, and then he played a 2/2 and attacked with his 2/1 first strike! I then bashed him down to 5 and played [card]Brimstone Volley[/card], and he died.

Game two got into a tricky position – I don’t know if I can describe the entire board state but it’s an interesting choice, so let’s try:

I have in play two Mountains, four Swamps, a [card]Rage Thrower[/card] and a [card]Diregraf Ghoul[/card]. My hand is [card]Devil’s Play[/card], [card]Traitorous Blood[/card], [card]Corpse Lunge[/card] (I have a 3/1 in my graveyard), [card]Instigator Gang[/card]. He is at 16 life.

He has one card in hand, a 4/2 that can block fliers (untapped), a tapped 3/4 flier, a tapped 3/3 [card]Mausoleum Guard[/card] and a [card]Travel Preparations[/card] in his graveyard. I am at 6 life.

I thought for a while, and decided that either playing [card]Devil’s Play[/card] on one of his guys or [card]Instigator Gang[/card] would just leave me too far behind, so my play was to Threaten his [card]Mausoleum Guard[/card], attack with everything and then [card]Corpse Lunge[/card] it, getting two Spirits and hopefully killing him next turn. From my point of view, his best play was to block the [card]Rage Thrower[/card] with the Spider, which would put him to 11 assuming that was all I attacked with, so I decided to attack with the [card]Diregraf Ghoul[/card] as well – if he blocks that one, then he drops to five instead and I can kill him with the [card devil’s play]Fireball[/card] next turn, and if he blocks the [card]Rage Thrower[/card] (which is still his best play) then he just takes two extra damage. I did that and he took everything, going to 5 after I killed the 3/3, and I thought I’d win barring any sort of disaster. Turns out “disaster” was [card]Feeling of Dread[/card], and after he tapped my two Spirit tokens and flashed back his [card]Travel Preparations[/card] we were onto game three.

I still don’t know if I played it right or not – I think Threaten + Lunge is clearly the play here, but it might be better to just not attack at all and try to ride the [card]Rage Thrower[/card] to victory, or to just block with it – perhaps my best play is to not attack, chump his flier with a Spirit and trade the 2/4 for the Thrower, and then [card devil’s play]Fireball[/card] the flier, leaving me with a 2/2, a 1/1 flier and a Gang in hand and him with whatever he played last turn; the problem with this play is that, if he blocks the [card]Rage Thrower[/card] (which, again, is the worst case scenario for me, barring dying the way I died), then by not attacking with everything I miss three points of damage (if I bash, he takes 3 from the Guard + 2 from the Ghoul + 2 from the Thrower, whereas if I want to block then he takes just 4 from the Thrower), and attacking has the added benefit of him blocking the Ghoul and dying next turn, so the only card that really punishes me for attacking is the one he had, which I am not sure one should consider out of a GW deck.

Game three I started with 2/2 on turn one, 2/2 on turn two and a [card]Brimstone Volley[/card], but I drew way too many lands after that. He played a Wolf on turn two and an [card]Orchard Spirit[/card] on turn three, but refused to trade, so I got enough damage in that I could push the last of it through despite being flooded.

At this point I was 10-2, and needed to go 2-0 to be able to draw into the top 8.

My second draft was covered by Luis and you can find it here

The most interesting pick of the draft was, in my opinion, the first – it had [card]Midnight Haunting[/card], [card]Armored Skaab[/card] and [card]Battleground Geist[/card], and I honestly had no idea which one was better. I figured [card]Midnight Haunting[/card] was a little bit better, and it would also be decent to pick a White card and pass two Blue ones, so I picked it, but I really had no clue. Second pick then had [card]Gavony Township[/card], which made me feel very lucky – imagine if [card]Armored Skaab[/card] turns out to be the better pick, then that means I was rewarded greatly for my bad pick, and picks like this show why I think there is a lot of luck involved in Booster Drafting too (less than sealed, obviously, but I think this whole “sealed is luck, drafting is skill” is a myth, Sealed is a lot less luck based than people think and Draft is the opposite). As it turned out, though, I now think [card]Midnight Haunting[/card] is the best of those cards, with [card]Armored Skaab[/card] coming second.

The rest of the draft was pretty straightforward, with the other relevant pick being the [card]Avacyn’s Pilgrim[/card] or [card]Mausoleum Guard[/card]. I took the Guard, but that was a mistake, the Pilgrim is much better – I think the reason I took the guard was that I had played against it the round before and it had been very very good against my BR aggro deck, so it seemed artificially better than it was (though I don’t think it’s bad at all). My deck ended up like this:

[deck]8 Forest
1 Gavony Township
8 Plains
2 Ambush Viper
1 Champion of the Parish
1 Elder of Laurels
1 Gatstaf Shepherd
1 Grizzled Outcasts
1 Hamlet Captain
1 Hollowhenge Scavenger
2 Mausoleum Guard
1 Slayer of the Wicked
1 Thraben Sentry
1 Unruly Mob
1 Woodland Sleuth
1 Bonds of Faith
1 Demonmail Hauberk
2 Midnight Haunting
2 Prey Upon
1 Silver-Inlaid Dagger
1 Smite the Monstrous
1 Travel Preparations[/deck]

I was very happy with it; It had some suboptimal cards ([card]Unruly Mob[/card], [card]Woodland Sleuth[/card] and [card]Hollowhenge Scavenger[/card], mainly), but even those weren’t horrible since I had two [card]Prey Upon[/card]s and a lot of tokens to dispose of.

My first match was not very eventful, and I won in two quick games. At 11-2, I was playing for top 8 against Alisson Abe. Alisson is one of the best Brazilian players right now, and I suspect you would know more about him if the lack of a US visa didn’t stop him from going to US tournaments. Alisson, just go get your visa, you’ll have to do it sooner or later!

Anyway, game one I played guy, guy, [card]Slayer of the Wicked[/card], [card]Travel Preparations[/card] and smashed him. Game two started very badly for me when he played two humans and [card]Butcher’s Cleaver[/card], but I managed to play [card]Midnight Haunting[/card] and trade for both, and then [card]Smite the Monstrous[/card] his third Human. I then played a couple guys and started to nibble at his increased life total, always trying to maneuver as to not get my Spirit tokens blown out by the [card]Sever the Bloodline[/card] I knew he had in his deck. The game extended for a while and I made multiple mistakes and lost when he had zero cards in his deck, the biggest of which being forgetting that his [card]Evil Twin[/card] had copied a human (which would grant it Lifelink with the Axe on his attack back). It was one of those games where, if I had played badly all game, I would have won because he only found his [card]Sever the Bloodline[/card] very late in the game, and if I had played well the whole game then I would also have won, but instead I played well the first half and badly the second half and that was just disastrous.

It didn’t matter because I had a very sweet draw game three (turn two Snake, turn three Haunting, turn four Haunting, turn five Township), and he got kinda unlucky – he had three [card]Delver of Secrets[/card] that he never flipped, though I’m quite confident I would have won anyway even if he had done so unless he had the [card]Sever the Bloodline[/card] to go with them (which he didn’t).

So I ended up 12-2, and drew my last round to make top 8. Owen and Martin also made it, which was sweet, and Owen was passing to me in the top 8 draft.

I started the top 8 with a [card]Slayer of the Wicked[/card] over a [card]Gavony Township[/card], while the guy I was passing to opened a [card]Bloodline Keeper[/card]. After that I picked two blue cards, but blue quickly dried out (it turned out Owen was blue), and I moved into GW when I got some late green cards, despite passing the Township (though I knew the guy next to me wouldn’t be GW anyway, unless he had been unable to resist the [card]Bloodline Keeper[/card]/[card]Gavony Township[/card] killer combo). My most interesting choice was in pack three, when I had to choose between my third [card]Travel Preparations[/card] or [card]Spectral Rider[/card]. I think [card]Travel Preparations[/card] is a better card, but since I already had two, I figured the evasion body would be more important. I would have won game 1 against Melissa if the guy had been a Preparations, but that doesn’t necessarily make it right or wrong. Here is my deck:

[deck]9 Forest
8 Plains
2 Abbey Griffin
1 Avacynian Priest
2 Avacyn’s Pilgrim
1 Darkthicket Wolf
1 Elder Cathar
1 Orchard Spirit
1 Slayer of the Wicked
1 Spectral Rider
1 Thraben Sentry
1 Village Bell-Ringer
3 Villagers of Estwald
1 Woodland Sleuth
2 Bonds of Faith
2 Silver-Inlaid Dagger
1 Spidery Grasp
2 Travel Preparations[/deck]

I think it was the worst of my three decks, but I was not unhappy with it, though some of the cards were, again, mediocre ([card]Village Bell-Ringer[/card], for example, isn’t very good, and neither is the Sleuth without any [card]Prey Upon[/card]s). Still, I had two [card]Silver-Inlaid Dagger[/card]s, and they were both Humans. You can also find this match in the coverage.

Game one started very much in my favor against Melissa, since she missed her third land drop (though soon found it). At some point, I made a horrible attack to get her to three, which I think ended up costing me the game – I had to draw a lot of land after that and she had to draw business, but if I hadn’t made the bad attack, I think I would have won regardless of drawing bad or not. I sided in two Exorcisms, since she had some Spirits.

Game two I mulliganed to five, but it was a good five – Pilgrim, the 2/3 Werewolf, three land. I drew another Werewolf and thought that I might actually win, but I drew a ton of lands after that too, and though she was also flooded herself, the two cards I was missing from my mulligans really hurt me and she was able to race my Wolves with two fliers and a tapper. It is very possible that I should have played 16 land, since I had two Pilgrims – the way it ended up, my deck had too many bad draws in the late game, and when I failed to kill her early both times that fact came back to haunt me, as I drew my 1/1s, 2/2s and lands while she was drawing 3/3s or guys with First Strike.

So I finished the tournament in 6th, scooping up 5 Pro Points which puts me at 41 and level 7 for next year – to level 8 I need to either get at least a point in San Diego and then do well at Worlds or to top 8 Worlds.

Other than my finish, which I was obviously very pleased with, the tournament was not good. I can safely say it’s in the top 3 worst major tournaments I’ve ever played in, all things considered (delays, organization, room to play, location, etc) – the other two are GP São Paulo from two years ago and the 2HG GP in Amsterdam. It really is tough to demand more GPs for Latin America when we do such a horrible job every time we have one.

I was also not in love of drafting with the double-faced cards, especially because there was no standard – some people would count their cards as they passed them, which made flip cards evident, but some people would just throw a stack and you wouldn’t know. Some people would put the double faced cards on top of their piles once the review period was over, announcing to everyone which colors they were. At some point, I was flipping two cards in my hand, debating which one to pick, and I realized one of them was a double faced card, so even though I ended up not taking it, everyone who was paying attention knew that I was considering that card, so I had to be in those colors. The potential for abuse in this is not irrelevant, especially if you have a friend drafting close to you, and I think rules on this regard should be announced – can I place the flip card on top of my pile when I am done reviewing? Do I have to? Other than that, though, Innistrad proved to be an awesome format to draft, with synergy and curve playing a big role, which I think makes it more interesting and rewarding, and it is also pretty fun – I look forward to drafting it many more times.

I hope you’ve liked this, and see you next week!

PV

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