PT Born of the Gods is in the books, and with it a large number of successful brews and innovations.

Tron

The relative absence of Jund means that Zoo and Twin were well positioned, which in turn means that Tron took a serious hit. After all, Jund was one of the deck’s better matchups and Zoo and Twin are both very difficult.

Still, Modern is a format that rewards mastery of an archetype, as we see with certain Pod players and Alex Majlaton with Affinity. Rather than commit to learning a new deck entirely, some brave Tron players decided to tune for the changing meta.

Gr Tron, by Kenichirou Arai

[ccdeck]1 Cavern of Souls
1 Ghost Quarter
1 Grove of the Burnwillows
1 Eye of Ugin
2 Forest
4 Urza’s Mine
4 Urza’s Power Plant
4 Urza’s Tower
1 Ulamog, the Infinite Gyre
2 Sundering Titan
4 Wurmcoil Engine
2 Spellskite
4 Expedition Map
4 Mishra’s Bauble
4 Ancient Stirrings
4 Chromatic Sphere
4 Chromatic Star
4 Sylvan Scrying
1 All Is Dust
4 Oblivion Stone
4 Karn Liberated
—–Sideboard—–
3 Torpor Orb
1 Dismember
3 Nature’s Claim
3 Relic of Progenitus
3 Defense Grid
1 Vandalblast
1 Sundering Titan[/ccdeck]

When I first saw this list, my eyes saw the Urza lands and glazed over. On second glance, this list has a number of innovations that let it outperform the other Tron decks at this Pro Tour.

For starters, with Zoo edging out Affinity as the top aggro deck, [ccProd]Pyroclasm[/ccProd] is no longer sharp enough to cut the mustard. Here, Arai removes them entirely for another cantrip ([ccProd]Mishra’s Bauble[/ccProd]). He also runs some maindeck blockers in [ccProd]Spellskite[/ccProd] and a fifth expensive sweeper in [ccProd]All is Dust[/ccProd].

One major adjustment is the addition of a pair of [ccProd]Sundering Titan[/ccProd]s and a tutorable [ccProd]Cavern of Souls[/ccProd]. When testing for any given high-level event, it’s fair to assume that most or all of the players will be Spikes, and a lot of Spikes gravitate toward blue decks. By playing uncounterable Sundering Titans in the main, as well as a third and some [ccProd]Defense Grid[/ccProd]s in the sideboard, Arai positioned himself to take advantage of players’ tendencies toward blue control decks.

Sundering Titan has other utility, too. While it’s a little slow vs. Zoo, if you can land it on turn four it acts as a one-sided [ccProd]Armageddon[/ccProd] with a 7/10 body attached. Against Valakut, sticking Sundering Titan should buy enough time to win, though it’s less exciting against the two-color version.

The other Tron deck to crack the top Modern decks is more typical, though it did shave a Pyroclasm for a [ccProd]Firespout[/ccProd].

5c Gifts

When Deathrite got banned, I took a minute to go over all of the Deathrite Shaman lists to see which were still viable. Decks that relied on Deathrite to be a threat, like that Zur deck I made videos with, were no longer a thing. However, when I looked at 5c Gifts I wondered if they would just add some [ccProd]Birds of Paradise[/ccProd] and run with it.

5c Gifts, by Marco Cammilluzzi

[ccdeck]4 Verdant Catacombs
2 Misty Rainforest
2 Marsh Flats
1 Overgrown Tomb
1 Hallowed Fountain
1 Godless Shrine
1 Temple Garden
1 Breeding Pool
2 Creeping Tar Pit
1 Celestial Colonnade
1 Urborg, Tomb of Yawgmoth
1 Watery Grave
1 Tectonic Edge
1 Ghost Quarter
1 Twilight Mire
1 Swamp
1 Forest
1 Plains
1 Island
4 Birds of Paradise
2 Sylvan Caryatid
1 Elesh Norn, Grand Cenobite
4 Snapcaster Mage
1 Thragtusk
1 Iona, Shield of Emeria
1 Raven’s Crime
2 Inquisition of Kozilek
4 Gifts Ungiven
1 Life from the Loam
2 Lingering Souls
1 Timely Reinforcements
1 Unburial Rites
1 Slaughter Pact
3 Path to Exile
2 Thoughtseize
1 Maelstrom Pulse
3 Liliana of the Veil
—–Sideboard—–
3 Nihil Spellbomb
2 Negate
1 Damnation
1 Supreme Verdict
1 Wrath of God
1 Stony Silence
3 Timely Reinforcements
1 Thragtusk
1 Aven Mindcensor
1 Terra Stomper[/ccdeck]

While the deck loses some power with the loss of Deathrite Shaman, it gains a ton by not having to fight through opposing Deathrites. [ccProd]Gifts Ungiven[/ccProd] gets a lot better, and now it can run the full set of [ccProd]Snapcaster Mage[/ccProd]s with impunity, too.

Aside from the addition of Birds of Paradise, this list is fairly stock. One card I haven’t seen before is the sideboard [ccProd]Terra Stomper[/ccProd], which is some spicy tech for the control mirrors. It can get Pathed, but they should be cutting those since the only targets are mana Birds, cheap value dudes, and an [ccProd]Iona[/ccProd] that doesn’t name white. [ccProd]Thrun[/ccProd] is another option for that slot, but it can get stalled out by [ccProd]Lingering Souls[/ccProd] or [ccProd]Bitterblossom[/ccProd] tokens, and it runs the risk of getting trumped in the mirror. Like if your opponent shows up with Terra Stomper.

Blue Moon

Going into the event, most people thought 5c Gifts and UWR were the only viable control options.

Blue Moon, by Kelvin Chew

[ccdeck]10 Island
1 Mountain
4 Misty Rainforest
4 Scalding Tarn
3 Steam Vents
2 Master of Waves
3 Snapcaster Mage
4 Lightning Bolt
4 Spell Snare
2 Spreading Seas
4 Serum Visions
2 Vapor Snag
2 Threads of Disloyalty
2 Vedalken Shackles
2 Batterskull
4 Blood Moon
2 Mana Leak
3 Remand
2 Cryptic Command
—–Sideboard—–
3 Anger of the Gods
2 Vandalblast
2 Flame Slash
1 Negate
1 Counterflux
3 Vendilion Clique
2 Spreading Seas
1 Relic of Progenitus[/ccdeck]

This deck reminds me of the old-school MUC lists with [ccProd]Back to Basics[/ccProd] to break the game. Only B2B isn’t legal, so it splashes for [ccProd]Blood Moon[/ccProd] and [ccProd]Lightning Bolt[/ccProd].

I’ve heard a lot of people mocking the Master of Waves in a deck without much devotion to blue, but it only needs one Snapcaster Mage or [ccProd]Spreading Seas[/ccProd] to contribute 6 power for four mana, and protection from red is incredibly relevant in this format. The deck wants efficient cards it can play alongside countermagic, but it also wants a win condition that gets there once the game goes late, and Master is both of those things. Also, curving out with [ccProd]Threads of Disloyalty[/ccProd] has to feel good.

This deck will stay competitive for as long as Blood Moon is good.

BG Rock

Even before the changes, one of the Jund variants cut red to become not-Jund, and that build had some success on MTGO. Now, with a pile of Zoo decks running around, there’s even more incentive to run a more pain-free mana base.

Reid Duke and Matt Costa both graced the top Modern decks with this spicy little number:

BG Rock, by Reid Duke

[ccdeck]4 Verdant Catacombs
2 Marsh Flats
2 Overgrown Tomb
4 Twilight Mire
2 Urborg, Tomb of Yawgmoth
1 Woodland Cemetery
4 Swamp
1 Forest
4 Treetop Village
4 Dark Confidant
4 Tarmogoyf
4 Scavenging Ooze
4 Phyrexian Obliterator
2 Kitchen Finks
4 Inquisition of Kozilek
2 Thoughtseize
3 Abrupt Decay
2 Maelstrom Pulse
2 Slaughter Pact
1 Victim of Night
4 Liliana of the Veil
—–Sideboard—–
3 Fulminator Mage
3 Creeping Corrosion
2 Grafdigger’s Cage
2 Deathmark
2 Thoughtseize
1 Thrun, the Last Troll
1 Sword of Light and Shadow
1 Kitchen Finks[/ccdeck]

Anyone who knows me knows that I love some [ccProd]Phyrexian Obliterator[/ccProd]. In fact, I compared the card to [ccProd]Tombstalker[/ccProd] when it was first printed, and it carried me to the Top 8 of a Legacy Open.

This deck is a nightmare for Zoo, featuring efficient removal into giants walls and almost insultingly incidental life gain. [ccProd]Thoughtseize[/ccProd] and [ccProd]Dark Confidant[/ccProd] are the few awkward cards, and they can get trimmed for even more efficient removal and the third Finks post board.

Speaking of Finks, a lot of Jundy lists switched to [ccProd]Courser of Kruphix[/ccProd] in those slots, as it combines well with fetchlands and helps grind out card advantage. Against Zoo specifically, [ccProd]Kitchen Finks[/ccProd] is better since it gains the life up front and they can’t just attack + burn spell it after blocks. Here, I’m guessing the Zoo matchup is good enough to afford the switch.

Obliterator plays an important role as a [ccProd]Tarmogoyf[/ccProd] that you really can’t attack into or burn out. You can still [ccProd]Path to Exile[/ccProd] it, but between all the discard and other Path targets the opponent should be out by the time Obliterator comes down. Snapcaster is an issue, though the deck does have four [ccProd]Scavenging Ooze[/ccProd] and can bring in [ccProd]Grafdigger’s Cage[/ccProd] post-board.

Speaking of the sideboard, it looks solid. [ccProd]Creeping Corrosion[/ccProd] is necessary, as the Affinity matchup is questionable without it. I’ve never gotten to rebuy a [ccProd]Fulminator Mage[/ccProd] with a [ccProd]Sword of Light and Shadow[/ccProd] before, but I bet it feels amazing.

UWR Twin

Whenever I see one of my decks do well, I feel like a proud father. “My baby! My baby did well on the Pro Tour!”

UWR Twin was especially well positioned for this event. Its main advantage over normal Twin is that instead of playing the underpowered blue cantrips, it uses those slots to stall the opponent and advance its board position. [ccProd]Restoration Angel[/ccProd], as well as [ccProd]Celestial Colonnade[/ccProd], means it can turn into an aggro-control deck, mitigating the effectiveness of hate. Having access to [ccProd]Wall of Omens[/ccProd] and [ccProd]Lightning Helix[/ccProd], as well as the occasional turn four kill, crushes Zoo. On top of that, the top performing UWR Twin lists adopted some number of Anger of the Gods.

Going in, I didn’t think Anger was necessary, as Zoo is such a good matchup without it. You do need some kind of sweeper to answer [ccProd]Geist of Saint Traft[/ccProd], but [ccProd]Volcanic Fallout[/ccProd] is almost necessary for beating Faeries and [ccProd]Engineered Explosives[/ccProd] has more utility against hate like [ccProd]Spellskite[/ccProd] and [ccProd]Torpor Orb[/ccProd]. However, the players I talked to didn’t expect much Faeries and Anger is real good at shoring up the Pod matchup. While I’ve never lost to Pod with UWR Twin, double [ccProd]Voice of Resurgence[/ccProd] draws are troublesome, so I can see it.

UWR Twin, by Tim Rivera

[ccdeck]2 Mountain
4 Arid Mesa
4 Celestial Colonnade
1 Hallowed Fountain
1 Plains
2 Island
2 Sacred Foundry
4 Scalding Tarn
2 Sulfur Falls
2 Steam Vents
2 Snapcaster Mage
4 Wall of Omens
4 Deceiver Exarch
4 Restoration Angel
3 Kiki-Jiki, Mirror Breaker
4 Path to Exile
4 Remand
4 Splinter Twin
4 Lightning Bolt
3 Lightning Helix
—–Sideboard—–
3 Anger of the Gods
2 Sowing Salt
3 Dispel
2 Stony Silence
1 Engineered Explosives
2 Spellskite
1 Wear Tear
1 Lightning Helix[/ccdeck]

What a clean list!

The main deck trims my miser’s [ccProd]Spellskite[/ccProd] and sweeper. They’ve been reasonable for me, though the Spellskite was mostly there to free up a sideboard slot. Modern is so diverse, and it almost needs 30-card sideboards. The miser’s sweeper is more necessary than it appears, as it means your controlling hands have an out to [ccProd]Geist of Saint Traft[/ccProd]. Since Geist is a slower threat and the deck has eight cantrips, that interaction does come up.

Still, he shaved them for good cards. Since it costs the same as a combo piece, Snapcaster was never amazing, though it gets better without Deathrite, and I can’t argue with upping the Restoration Angel count.

With Tron on the decline (and a decent overall matchup) the sideboard [ccProd]Sowing Salts[/ccProd] would be better off as [ccProd]Combust[/ccProd]s.

Other than that, nothing to say besides congrats on the Top 8.

UWR Twin, by Deshaun Baylock

[ccdeck]4 Scalding Tarn
1 Plains
1 Island
1 Mountain
1 Hallowed Fountain
1 Clifftop Retreat
1 Rugged Prairie
2 Sacred Foundry
2 Sulfur Falls
2 Steam Vents
4 Celestial Colonnade
4 Arid Mesa
2 Spellskite
2 Kiki-Jiki, Mirror Breaker
4 Restoration Angel
4 Deceiver Exarch
4 Wall of Omens
2 Anger of the Gods
2 Lightning Helix
4 Splinter Twin
4 Remand
4 Lightning Bolt
4 Path to Exile
—–Sideboard—–
1 Combust
2 Vendilion Clique
2 Counterflux
2 Stony Silence
1 Negate
2 Anger of the Gods
2 Ajani Vengeant
1 Lightning Helix
2 Wear Tear[/ccdeck]

A lot of things about Deshaun’s list make me happy. He not only kept the sideboard [ccProd]Ajani Vengeant[/ccProd], which has always been reasonable, but he upped it to two, meaning it has been good in his testing as well.

One thing that makes my eye twitch is the [ccProd]Rugged Prairie[/ccProd] in his mana base. A filter land or two is great for smoothing out [ccProd]Kiki-Jiki[/ccProd] draws, and I’ll even go up to three for [ccProd]Cryptic Command[/ccProd], but never Rugged Prairie. There’s no double-white in the casting costs! It doesn’t look like there’s double-blue either, but note the sideboard [ccProd]Vendilion Clique[/ccProd] and [ccProd]Counterflux[/ccProd].

Quad-[ccProd]Anger of the Gods[/ccProd] seems like absurd overkill. Between Remand and Wall of Omens, you’re going to see the two maindeck copies a reasonable amount of the time. If you really want a fourth sweeper, [ccProd]Engineered Explosives[/ccProd] is a genuinely good card, and I’m never unhappy to have a copy or two.

In the sideboard, shaving Negate for Counterflux makes some kind of sense. After all, Negate’s main advantage is that it can stop a turn three Karn on the draw (Remand loses to the same Karn on turn four), but with Tron taking up less of the pie there’s less of a reason to value efficiency over resiliency. With that amount of Storm and Twin at the top tables, I would’ve been very happy with the decision to up the Counterflux count. Note that an overloaded Counterflux can counter all of the copies of a storm card, though it’s usually best not to let it reach that point as sometimes they can combo twice.

UWR Twin, by Jonathan Hickerson

[ccdeck]4 Arid Mesa
4 Scalding Tarn
2 Island
2 Mountain
1 Sulfur Falls
1 Cascade Bluffs
1 Hallowed Fountain
1 Sacred Foundry
2 Steam Vents
4 Celestial Colonnade
1 Plains
2 Kiki-Jiki, Mirror Breaker
3 Restoration Angel
3 Pestermite
3 Deceiver Exarch
3 Snapcaster Mage
1 Spellskite
4 Serum Visions
3 Splinter Twin
3 Lightning Helix
4 Remand
1 Swan Song
4 Lightning Bolt
3 Path to Exile
—–Sideboard—–
1 Swan Song
2 Negate
2 Grafdigger’s Cage
1 Celestial Purge
2 Anger of the Gods
2 Vendilion Clique
1 Spellskite
1 Path to Exile
1 Counterflux
1 Wear Tear
1 Rest in Peace[/ccdeck]

While I don’t agree with some of Hickerson’s changes, he made them with an idea of how the deck functions and I respect that. A number of players asked me for my thoughts on cutting the fourth [ccProd]Splinter Twin[/ccProd], and it’s generally fine, though I like it more if you’re adding the fourth [ccProd]Restoration Angel[/ccProd]. Restoration Angel always overperforms in this deck, serving as a crazy removal spell and combining with the burn and Colonnades as a backup win condition. Here, Hickerson favors extra [ccProd]Pestermite[/ccProd]s, which is reasonable since it’s a more consistent combo card. Also, he lacks the Wall of Omens to turn Resto into a cantrip, and even three might be overkill.

In fact, cutting Wall almost necessitates shaving a Splinter Twin, as throwing it on a stray Wall is the best use for redundant copies. It’s also a great way to grind out a control mirror, though Snapcaster Mage should be good at that too.

Another change I’m iffy on is the shaving of a Path to Exile. Maindeck Path is your best answer to a giant Tarmogoyf, Celestial Colonnade, or opposing Twin combo. It also takes out Voice of Resurgence against Pod. On the other hand, the additional Snapcaster Mages give a lot of depth to the removal suite. It’s counter-intuitive, but the deck might have Path more consistently now than when it ran four.

KCI

I have an affinity for engine-based combo decks, and [ccProd]Krark-Clan Ironworks[/ccProd] is no exception. I also have a strong nostalgia for the card, as that was right around when I started getting good at tournament Magic. Unfortunately, the popularity of [ccProd]Disciple of the Vault[/ccProd] held it back when it was in Standard.

In Modern it gets bricked by [ccProd]Stony Silence[/ccProd], though the card is rare enough to make KCI worth considering. Conley tried it and got close. I tried it as well, and the power of the nut [ccProd]Mox Opal[/ccProd] draw kept me coming back until I had to admit defeat.

Fortunately, a mad genius in Japan figured it out.

KCI, by Taisuke Ishii

[ccdeck]1 Plains
1 City of Brass
1 Adarkar Wastes
1 Tendo Ice Bridge
1 Glimmervoid
3 Darksteel Citadel
4 Urza’s Mine
4 Urza’s Power Plant
4 Urza’s Tower
3 Emrakul, the Aeons Torn
4 Krark-Clan Ironworks
4 Chromatic Sphere
4 Chromatic Star
4 Mox Opal
4 Ichor Wellspring
3 Mind Stone
4 Prophetic Prism
2 Remand
2 Thirst for Knowledge
4 Open the Vaults
2 Tezzeret the Seeker
—–Sideboard—–
3 Erase
3 Defense Grid
1 Hurkyl’s Recall
2 Pyroclasm
1 Rest for the Weary
2 Torpor Orb
1 Blood Moon
1 Phyrexian Unlife
1 Wurmcoil Engine[/ccdeck]

A lot of people tried hybridizing KCI with Eggs, which sort of worked because of all the overlapping parts. One combo would frequently cantrip into the other. Ishii succeeded in realizing KCI as its own deck, and his list is designed with that distinction. Without situational cards like [ccProd]Lotus Bloom[/ccProd] or [ccProd]Second Sunrise[/ccProd], the deck consistently performs the same way every game, which is what you want out of your engine deck.

The real beauty in this list is the mana base. For starters, he split his situational fixers so that he never draws two of the wrong one. More importantly, he worked in the Tron lands to cantrip into, which has a lot of synergy with his win condition of triple [ccProd]Emrakul, the Aeons Torn[/ccProd]. Even if he never draws an [ccProd]Open the Vaults[/ccProd], he can still cast an early Emrakul and win. Against control, it grants inevitability.

The sideboard looks well constructed, and I assume the Pyroclasms are to help race Affinity. The deck can’t tutor for the bullets, but it cantrips so much that direct tutors aren’t necessary, and if you board in too many cards you damage the engine. Three Defense Grids and three Erase are necessary because you need them early against countermagic and Stony Silence.

Faeries

A lot of people laughed off Faeries for this event, mostly citing its weakness to Zoo and Affinity. However, Modern is such a diverse format that, if you like your matchups against combo and control, you can get away with ignoring aggro for the most part. Plus, the Zoo matchup is largely fixable post-board with some combination of Deathmarks, Batterskull, and Engineered Explosives.

The haters kept laughing when only six players showed up with Faeries, but half of those guys Day 2’d. Of them, Alex Sittner and Shouta Yasooka cracked the top Modern decks section.

Faeries, by Alex Sittner

[ccdeck]4 Mutavault
4 Secluded Glen
4 River of Tears
4 Darkslick Shores
4 Creeping Tar Pit
2 Tectonic Edge
2 Island
1 Watery Grave
1 Sunken Ruins
4 Mistbind Clique
4 Spellstutter Sprite
3 Snapcaster Mage
2 Vendilion Clique
3 Cryptic Command
4 Bitterblossom
3 Mana Leak
2 Spell Snare
1 Doom Blade
1 Smother
1 Go for the Throat
1 Peppersmoke
1 Shadow of Doubt
2 Thoughtseize
2 Inquisition of Kozilek
—–Sideboard—–
3 Deathmark
2 Hurkyl’s Recall
1 Engineered Explosives
1 Drown in Sorrow
1 Inquisition of Kozilek
2 Spellskite
1 Dispel
1 Vendilion Clique
2 Grafdigger’s Cage
1 Surgical Extraction[/ccdeck]

Alex went heavy on [ccProd]Snapcaster Mage[/ccProd], which gives a lot of depth to his disruption suite and lets him take advantage of [ccProd]Spell Snare[/ccProd].

While I like Tectonic Edge and Creeping Tar Pit a lot, I think Alex is running too many of them. [ccProd]Cryptic Command[/ccProd] aside, the deck has a ton of color requirements, and you almost have to shave a [ccProd]Mutavault[/ccProd] or go up to 27 lands to fit in a second Tectonic Edge. Meanwhile, four Creeping Tar Pit makes early turns awkward, as you can’t use it for the turn one discard into turn two [ccProd]Bitterblossom[/ccProd] draw. It and Darkslick Shores make eight lands you can’t topdeck to cast a turn four Cryptic Command or Mistbind Clique.

All of that said, spell lands are awesome, and I don’t hate upping the land count to fit more in.

The sideboard seems fine for the most part. At first I didn’t like the [ccProd]Hurkyl’s Recall[/ccProd]s, since trying to fix an unwinnable matchup is a waste of slots, but with all the Snapcasters it might actually be doable.

I would like some kind of life gain for aggressive-type decks. In the past, Faeries has run everything from [ccProd]Bottle Gnomes[/ccProd] to [ccProd]Loxodon Warhammer[/ccProd] to beat aggro, and a [ccProd]Batterskull[/ccProd] or two would go a long way.

Faeries, by Shouta Yasooka

[ccdeck]4 Secluded Glen
4 Mutavault
4 Darkslick Shores
4 River of Tears
3 Sunken Ruins
2 Creeping Tar Pit
2 Island
2 Swamp
4 Spellstutter Sprite
3 Vendilion Clique
3 Mistbind Clique
1 Snapcaster Mage
2 Thoughtseize
4 Bitterblossom
3 Cryptic Command
3 Inquisition of Kozilek
2 Mana Leak
2 Tragic Slip
2 Go for the Throat
2 Sword of Feast and Famine
1 Agony Warp
1 Smother
2 Liliana of the Veil
—–Sideboard—–
2 Batterskull
2 Glen Elendra Archmage
1 Thoughtseize
1 Relic of Progenitus
2 Threads of Disloyalty
3 Deathmark
2 Flashfreeze
2 Jace Beleren[/ccdeck]

This version reminds me of my proposed list from my B&R Hype article, particularly the 2-2 split between [ccProd]Liliana of the Veil[/ccProd] and [ccProd]Sword of Feast and Famine[/ccProd]. It feels good, not because I think my list influenced Shouta, but because I’m happy to reach some of the same conclusions as one of the best deckbuilders of all time, even if those ideas seem obvious to some.

That said, of course Shoota’s list is more refined that the one I proposed a few days after the banning announcement. I never would’ve thought of [ccProd]Tragic Slip[/ccProd], but it’s an amazing tool that combines with blockers or other removal to take out large creatures at maximum efficiency. Without [ccProd]Deathrite Shaman[/ccProd], it kills turn one mana dorks again!

While Alex’s list looks to fix the Affinity matchup post-board, Shouta’s has a much stronger game against Zoo between all the Batterskulls and [ccProd]Threads of Disloyalty[/ccProd].

I’m not sure about the [ccProd]Jace Beleren[/ccProd]s, though it is a consistent, powerful card that swaps in for dead removal and helps ensure you don’t flood out in matchups that you have time to resolve it. My instinct is to run Negate in that slot, but he already has [ccProd]Flashfreeze[/ccProd] for Valakut and against Twin all of the maindeck removal is live.

Other Decks

There were some other sweet lists at the top tables, including Owen’s Zoo list and a tweaked RG Valakut list that a lot of CFB members did well with, but I expect others to write about them and with more depth than I can. In fact, now that I think of it, someone’s probably writing about the BG Rock deck, and I hope they forgive me in my excitement.

As for the [ccProd]Amulet of Vigor[/ccProd] deck, I have to congratulate Mathius Hunt for doing well with a deck that I didn’t think was competitive. Of course, I always face it with UWR Twin, which is probably one of the deck’s worst matchups, and it should be more playable vs. the rest of the field. Still, it gets the Legacy Weapon seal of don’t-try-this-at-home. Or do, but keep it there.

Caleb Durward