When I saw this deck Top 8 the Modern Challenge on MTGO this weekend, I was definitely taken aback. Buckle up, because this is a saucy number.

We all know about the Modern combo that features Devoted Druid and Vizier of Remedies. Vizier bypasses the problem other cards have had in that it puts one fewer counter on Devoted Druid, meaning that you can untap it an arbitrarily large (infinite) number of times to add that much green mana to your mana pool. Previous cards would have prevented the Druid from getting counters, but that just meant you couldn’t activate the ability to ever untap it. By assembling these two creatures, you have access to any amount of mana, and from there, you have a number of ways to win the game. The issues: It requires two cards, and the Devoted Druid needs to lose summoning sickness before it can be tapped for mana. This gives the opponent plenty of time to react to the combo, since you need to untap with the Druid to use it.

Enter Hall of the Bandit Lord. This card that I’ve never seen played before can give your Druid haste the turn you cast it to win without needing an additional turn to set things up.

You also need to assemble both of these creatures in play. We’ve seen decks go with cards like Collected Company and Chord of Calling, but those are both expensive and, in the case of Company, don’t always give you what you’re looking for. This deck gets right to the point. You have Summoner’s Pact to make sure you always have access to a Devoted Druid. This also gives you an additional way to make sure you can go get Duskwatch Recruiter to win the game once you already have infinite mana at your disposal.

But wait, there’s more! Traverse the Ulvenwald tutors for either creature in your combo as long as you have delirium. It can even go get Hall of the Bandit Lord. In the early game, it represents additional land drops.

You’re playing a crazy low land count in this deck, but with plenty of ways to draw extra cards or to find additional lands. There’s a full playset of Mishra’s Bauble, as well as a pair of Conjurer’s Bauble. This does provide a little bit of utility, but mostly you’re playing cheap ways to get an artifact into your graveyard for Traverse and replacing them with a new card.

You even have enchantments in the deck to help. There’s a full playset of Oath of Nissa to find the lands you need or missing parts of your combo.

As if that wasn’t enough ways to search for your creatures, you’re playing Weird Harvests. You don’t mind your opponent also searching out creatures when they’re going to be dead.

Modern all-star Ancient Stirrings adds another sorcery for delirium and another way to smooth your draws. While this won’t be able to find either creature in your combo, it does help fix your mana, find a Bauble to replace itself, or help you find your win condition.

Once you have infinite mana, you win with Walking Ballista. If they made you discard Ballista, you can get it back with Conjurer’s Bauble. If it’s buried in your deck, you can go find it with Duskwatch Recruiter (off of Summoner’s Pact), use Weird Harvest, or Traverse.

The other random creatures in this deck help you continue to dig deeper and fuel delirium. Wild Cantor gives a bit of acceleration, while Street Wraiths and Deadshot Minotaur add consistency.

There’s also a full playset of Pact of Negation in this bad boy. The truth is that you’re basically only using this spell when you’re going off to stop a counter or a key removal spell. Because you’re winning so early in the game, it’s nearly impossible for an opponent to have enough mana to interact more than once. Pact can stop that one interactive spell and make sure you win before you will ever have to pay. Just in case, you have a Manamorphose in there to pay for Pact (yeah, it’s probably more for delirium).

This deck goes all-in on assembling an infinite mana combo as early in the game as possible with lands to give haste and counters to protect it for free. This looks to be an awesome and fun way to approach the format!

Turbo Devoted Druid

__MATSUGAN, Top 8 in an MTGO Modern Challenge