Token decks get a bad rap. They’re not flashy and they don’t play the most powerful cards in the format, but they have a lot to offer. There’s plenty of interaction, there are great sideboard options to improve every matchup, and you play well against spot removal. You even have a few cards that have been banned in other formats.

Token strategies may have the best anthem effect ever printed. Intangible Virtue was banned in Block Constructed thanks to how powerful it is, and this is the deck in which it really shines. Not only are you getting maximum bang for your buck in an anthem effect that pumps tokens since token makers tend to make several creatures at once, but giving this large army vigilance allows you to play offense and defense tremendously well. When you make 2-3 tokens from a single card, each copy of Virtue adds several extra points of power and toughness, making sure it’s nearly impossible to attack you profitably.

Lingering Souls is the best token maker we’ve seen. It’s strong enough that decks like Jund Death’s Shadow are splashing it in their sideboard. It can almost single-handedly defeat strategies like Affinity, who rely on small flying creatures to go wide. Souls plays well against spot removal and discard. Curving Intangible Virtue into Lingering Souls is a curve many decks will struggle with.

 

You also get to clear the path before you start putting your Virtues and tokens onto the battlefield. The full playset of both Thoughtseize and Inquisition of Kozilek give you lots of turn-1 plays to disrupt the opponent. Since you don’t care about their spot removal and creature interaction in the slightest, your discard spells are extra powerful since you always get to take the “best” cards.

Spectral Procession isn’t the easiest spell to cast on turn 3, especially when you want to lead on a discard spell, but you have tons of B/W dual lands and it’s still a great play on later turns. Three tokens with evasion put the opponent in a tough spot.

Sorin, Solemn Visitor is the best planeswalker for this deck as it accomplishes everything you want to do. It creates tokens with evasion and it pumps your team as needed. While Gideon, Ally of Zendikar can have a similar effect and hits a bit harder when you have an empty board, the lifelink Sorin provides makes racing impossible. The ultimate comes up often and is backbreaking in a variety of Modern matchups.

Start // Finish is yet another card that gives you tokens and interaction in the same card. Creating multiple creatures while giving you a late-game removal spell is quite versatile.

Bitterblossom is powerful enough that it was banned in Modern for a long period of time. I’m a bit surprised to only see 2 copies in this deck, as it plays well with Virtues and Sorin, but there may just not be enough room. Providing an extra flying token creature every turn at the expense of just a single life is a great bargain for just 2 mana. Legion’s Landing appears to be the spell that has started to replace copies of Bitterblossom. You’re more than capable of flipping your Landing to provide a great late-game engine that combos well with your anthems, and that amount of life gain is really punishing to opponents.

Your removal spells are cheap and efficient. You’ve got the playset of Path to Exiles, and then you have some Fatal Pushes to handle opposing creatures. You don’t have a ton of ways to turn on revolt, but stopping the early rush or a big Tarmogoyf is still important. Collective Brutality offers you a bit more removal on smaller creatures while giving you a bit of reach, some life gain, and discard spells #9 and #10 in the main.

B/W Tokens doesn’t have the flair of a Death’s Shadow deck, but it gets the job done in a major way. When people are loading up on Dismembers and Roasts to deal with Gurmag Anglers, Lingering Souls and Bitterblossom are an excellent foil!

B/W Tokens

THEIVANHOE, Top 16 in an MTGO Modern Challenge