Given that Toffel is the luckiest man on Earth while Jamin is the unluckiest, this week we thought it might be interesting to test the power of their respective luck attributes by flipping some coins with Mirror March. Winning a bunch of coin flips in a row to win the game on the spot is an enticing prospect, so we set out to build a deck that would make the most of what Mirror March offers.

Mirror March

This incentivized the inclusion of powerful, value-oriented creatures, most of which were high on the curve. As we’re already playing a 6-drop enchantment, it made sense to pull together a ramp shell to cast it in a timely fashion. From there, it made sense to have heavy-hitting payoffs at the top of the curve.

This deck actually showed a great deal of promise and offered a powerful game plan, resulting in a surprising conclusion after having played with it for awhile. From the outset, however, this Mirror March list is potent and is definitely one of the more competitively viable decks we’ve played on Arena Boys.

Mirror March

6 Mountain
10 Forest
4 Stomping Ground
4 Rootbound Crag
3 End-Raze Forerunners
2 Burning Sun's Avatar
4 Llanowar Elves
4 Regisaur Alpha
1 Rowdy Crew
2 Demanding Dragon
4 Incubation Druid
4 Mirror March
4 Gift of Paradise
4 Treasure Map/Treasure Cove
4 Lava Coil

Card Choices

As mentioned, this deck plays a pretty classic ramp shell that then houses a creature package designed to get the most out of Mirror March. There’s nothing too innovative about the ramp cards—Llanowar Elves and Incubation Druid are the cards you’re happiest to see in your opening hand, while Gift of Paradise is a nice life total buffer and Treasure Map offers some critical card selection.

In terms of top-end, Mirror March is looking for quite specific attributes from the creatures it can potentially flood the board with. You want to play enter-the-battlefield effects without diminishing returns. In other words, ones that are still relevant when copied en masse. Regisaur Alpha creates tokens that stick around past the turn they’re created (and also have haste!), and creatures that do direct damage such as Demanding Dragon and Burning Sun’s Avatar are great picks.

End-Raze Forerunners

These creatures have the potential to win the game on the spot, especially if you’ve already whittled away an opponent’s life total. But the best card to end games immediately with is End-Raze Forerunners. Even a single extra copy, thanks to Mirror March, can wrap things up. Finally, Rowdy Crew is… well, Rowdy Crew. We hoped to deck ourselves at least once with its triggered ability being copied, but it sadly never came to pass.

Lava Coil

Finally, Lava Coil is the single interactive spell in the deck, as a way to contest early starts or deal with problematic mid-sized creatures. It doesn’t really play into the game plan of the deck, but having even a light disruption suite can be very important.

Gameplay

This ramp deck seeks to enact the one-two punch of ramp decks everywhere: load up with early plays that create extra mana, then deploy haymakers swiftly and earlier than expected. It’s a simple but effective way to win games of Magic, and the overall power level of the top-end cards goes a long way in mitigating the overall lack of flexibility and adaptability of the deck.

Demanding Dragon

Managing the board can be very important, especially when considering cards such as Demanding Dragon. If you attack and block sensibly to make trades, then land a post-March Dragon, your opponent won’t have creatures to sacrifice to its ability and might just take ten or fifteen out of nowhere. Burning Sun’s Avatar is another terrific way to manage opposing boards. Remember to stack the Mirror March trigger to resolve first, so you know how many instances of 3 damage you’ll be able to play with. That way, you can intelligently take down creatures with more than 3 toughness.

End-Raze Forerunners is, of course, the strongest late game option and the card you’re hoping to see the most once you have 8 mana. Nothing comes close to it in terms of power level and it will almost always tip the balance in your favor if it doesn’t win the game outright. The card giving vigilance to the team means that an all-out attack loses you very little in the way of defense.

Finally, I want to discuss a very important distinction this deck has from other decks that are built around a big, clunky enchantment (for example, Thousand-Year Storm or Divine Visitation): It doesn’t actually need to draw or play Mirror March to win convincingly. The non-Mirror March elements of this deck are so powerful that Mirror March starts to feel like a win-more card, and that neatly brings us to the next section.

Moving Forward

It’s not entirely clear this deck is made better by Mirror March. Indeed, during much of the time I’ve played with this deck, Mirror March felt less like a critical component and more like the icing on top of an extremely potent cake. The creatures in this deck all speak for themselves, and while making a million End-Raze Forerunners makes for an excellent Twitch clip, they often still end up just as dead as they would have without Mirror March.

As a result, and as bizarre as this is, it might be better to cut Mirror March from the deck entirely and play it as a Gruul Monsters deck instead. I know that’s not as “fun” as playing with Mirror March, but for spikier players who are looking for a potent new brew, ramping into End-Raze Forerunners with such a powerful support cast actually seems pretty strong.

Mirror March

6 Mountain
10 Forest
4 Rootbound Crag
4 Stomping Ground
4 Rekindling Phoenix
3 End-Raze Forerunners
2 Burning Sun's Avatar
3 Siege-Gang Commander
4 Regisaur Alpha
4 Incubation Druid
4 Llanowar Elves
4 Gift of Paradise
4 Treasure Map/Treasure Cove
3 Lava Coil
1 Collision/Colossus

Out come a bunch of fun cards—Rowdy Crew, Demanding Dragon, and Mirror March—and instead they’re replaced with more respectable Constructed staples. Rekindling Phoenix scarcely needs an introduction as one of the most powerful red cards in Standard, while Siege-Gang Commander offers further interactive options and pairs supremely well with End-Raze Forerunners.

Of course, this all runs against the initial spirit of the deck, which is to win coin flips with Mirror March, but I thought it worth pointing out the competitive applications of this shell, as it has overperformed for me so far and a lot of decks don’t have a good way to deal with a massive swing powered by End-Raze Forerunners!